Grendon Parish Council

Serving the people of Grendon

Images of Grendon Village

Grendon Parish Council provides your local services. We strive to make Grendon a better place to live, work and play. Our website includes information about how we conduct business and what we do. Use the search or browse the site to find whatever you are looking for. If you can't find the information you require then please contact us.

Latest edition of the Grendon Times

Covid_19 pandemic

Re-opening of the Play Area

Following Government advice the Parish Council have been working hard to ensure that the play area is 'Covid Secure'. An extensive risk assessment has been carried out and the necessary mitigations put in place. Please ensure that you and your child are aware of, and adhere to these guidelines so that everyone can play safely. The play area will be re-opened from 9am on Saturday 4th July 2020.

In these difficult times the Parish Council has set-up a neighbours help scheme to support anyone who is self-isolating. You should have received a flyer through your door with details of a contact person who will help with shopping, collecting medication etc. If you haven't received this please contact the Clerk (Deborah) on 01933 663918 or email

clerk@grendon-pc.org.uk

We have also set-up a lending library of books / jigsaws etc in Church for anyone who is feeling rather bored - items borrowed at own risk.

If you are concerned about the symptoms of the coronavirus please visit the NHS website below or if you do not have internet access call 111. DO NOT GO TO YOUR GP SURGERY OR HOSPITAL UNLESS TOLD TO DO SO BY A MEDICAL PRACTITIONER.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/

Those requiring help are asked to call the support line on the following number. 0300 126 1000 (option 5). Individuals can also email nccg.communityresilience.covid19@nhs.net and ask for help.

Village Hopper Bus Service

The Village Hopper is a community mini-bus service that operates on a fixed route timetable 6 days each week.

The timetable can be viewed here;

Local Elections - postponed until May 2021

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-51876269

Website Feedback

Please take some time to complete the survey below and let us know what you think of the new website.

Latest News

Courier Fraud - Please Warn Elderly Relatives about This Scam

Courier Fraud - Please Warn Elderly Relatives about This Scam

Police officers will NEVER ask you for money – please warn elderly relatives about this emerging scam

Fraudsters pretending to be police officers are repeatedly targeting the elderly in Northamptonshire.

Over the past few months, a number of incidents have taken place across the county where fraudsters have pretended to be police officers conducting covert investigations in order to gain the trust of elderly people with the aim of scamming them out of their money. More »


What is Courier Fraud?

Courier fraud occurs when a fraudster contacts victims by telephone purporting to be a police officer or bank official. To substantiate this claim, the caller might be able to confirm some easily obtainable basic details about the victim such as their full name and address.

The caller may also offer a telephone number for the victim to telephone or ask the victim to call the number on the back of their bank card to check that they are genuine. In these circumstances, either the number offered will not be genuine or, where a genuine number is suggested, the fraudster will stay on the line and pass the victim to a different individual.

After some trust has been established, the fraudster will then, for example, suggest;

  • Some money has been removed from a victim's bank account and staff at their local bank branch are responsible.
  • Suspects have already been arrested but the "police" need money for evidence.
  • A business such as a jewellers or currency exchange is operating fraudulently and they require assistance to help secure evidence.

Victims are then asked to co-operate in an investigation by attending their bank and withdrawing money, withdrawing foreign currency from an exchange or purchasing an expensive item to hand over to a courier for examination who will also be a fraudster.

At the time of handover, unsuspecting victims are promised the money they've handed over or spent will be reimbursed but in reality there is no further contact and the money is never seen again.


Protect yourself

  • Your bank or the at your bank. If it's cancelled, you should destroy it yourself.

Spot the signs
  • Someone claiming to be from your bank or local police force calls you to tell you about fraudulent activity but is asking you for personal information or even your PIN to verify who you are.
  • They're offering you to call back so you can be sure they're genuine, but when you try to return the call there's no dial tone.
  • They try to offer you peace of mind by having somebody pick up the card for you to save you the trouble of having to go to your bank or local police station.

How it happens

You may get called on your mobile or landline by someone who claims to be from your bank or the police. They say their systems have spotted a fraudulent payment on your card or it is due to expire and needs to be replaced.

They might suggest that you hang up and redial the number of their bank or police force to reassure you that they're genuine. However, they don't disconnect the call from the landline so that when you dial the real phone number, you're still speaking to the same fraudster.

They'll then ask you to read out your credit or debit card PIN or type it on your phone keypad. They may ask for details of other accounts you hold with the bank or elsewhere to grab more information.

Then they promise to send a courier to you to collect your bank card. The fraudster will have your name, address, full bank details, card and its PIN, and withdraw cash using the card and may even use the information to commit identity fraud in your name.

If you've given your bank details over the phone or handed your card to a courier, call your bank straight away to cancel the card.

Message Sent By
Susan Fletcher (Police, Crime Prevention Officer, Northamptonshire)

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Posted: Thu, 03 Sep 2020 09:36 by Deborah Rush

Burglary - Yardley Hastings

Burglary - Yardley Hastings

There has been a report of a burglary to a garage on The Square, Yardley Hastings where a number of items were stolen.

This happened between 3:00pm on Monday 24th August and 4:00pm on Wednesday 26th August 2020. Did you see or hear anything suspicious?

If you noticed anything suspicious in the area or have any CCTV or dash cameras covering the area between these times, please contact Northamptonshire Police on 101 or follow the below online reporting link, quoting occurrence number 20000446445. More »

https://www.northants.police.uk/ro/report/ocr/af/how-to-report-a-crime/

In an emergency when there is a crime in progress , life at risk or an offender nearby , call 999.

You can provide confidential information should you wish to remain anonymous. These calls can be made to the Independent Charity Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111 or visit
www.crimestoppers-uk.org

You can follow our team on our Twitter accounts which include more live time information on our daily activities in South Northants @SthNorthantsNPT @BrackleyNptSgt

You can contact the Neighbourhood Team using the following email address:
NeighbourhoodTeamSouthNorthants-Towcester@northants.police.uk

Message Sent By
Nicole Degg (Police, Police Community Support Officer, Daventry and South Northants)

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Posted: Thu, 27 Aug 2020 09:26 by Deborah Rush

Scam Protection Advice

Scam Protection Advice

Criminals are experts at impersonating people, organisations and the police. They spend hours researching you hoping you'll let your guard down for just a moment.

They can contact you by phone, email, text, letters, on social media, or in person. They will try to trick you into parting with your money, personal information, or buying goods or services that don't exist.

To keep yourself and your devices secure please consider our top 10 tips: More »

1. Verify any unexpected contact is genuine by using a known number or email address to contact organisations directly – is this caller who they say they are? After hanging up, wait five minutes and make sure you can hear a dial tone before making any other calls, or use your mobile. NEVER allow an unsolicited caller remote access to your computer or devices.

2. Don't be pressurised into sending money – stop and think and check with a trusted source or person. It's ok to reject, refuse or ignore any requests. Only criminals will try to rush or panic you. Have confidence in yourself, if it feels wrong to you – it probably is.

3. Use someone you know and trust for shopping & other essentials. Don't hand money over to someone on the doorstep.

4. Authorities like the DWP and HMRC will never ask for banking details like your password or PIN on the phone or in person. You will NEVER be asked to move money to a 'safe account'. Police or banking representatives will NEVER ask you to help in an investigation by moving money or withdrawing funds.

5. Check for ID's and get them verified – genuine officials will be more than happy to wait while you verify their ID.

6. Pick strong passwords – choose Three Random Words with a mixture of upper/lower case, numbers and special characters. Do not use the same password across sites. Enable Two Factor Authentication (2FA) on your accounts and devices that offer it, this provides a second layer of security.

7. Be wary of phishing scams - Don't click on any links or attachments in unexpected emails.

8. Social Media – For those of you who use social media, make sure that it is set up correctly, review your privacy settings to ensure your profile is appropriately locked down.

9. Use antivirus and ensure you are using the latest versions of software, apps and operating systems on your phones, tablets, desktops and laptops. Update these regularly or set your devices to automatically update so you don't have to worry.

10. Backups – Always back up your most important data such as your photos and key documents to an external hard drive and / or cloud storage.

Report suspicious texts by forwarding them to 7726, which spells SPAM on your keypad.

If you think you've received a phishing email forward to report@phishing.gov.uk.

If you think you've fallen victim to a scam contact your bank immediately and report it to Action Fraud by visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk or calling 0300 123 2040.

Message Sent By
Kelly Noble (Police, Social Media Engagement Officer, Corporate Communications, Countywide)

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Posted: Tue, 12 May 2020 14:55 by Deborah Rush